Some tools to drool over.  Image (c) 1998 Jock Dempsey WELCOME to the
Virtual Hammer-In!

This page is open to ALL for the purpose of advancing blacksmithing.

Why three forums? Well, this is YOUR blacksmithing forum to use for whatever you wish within the rules stated above. It is different than the Slack-Tub Pub because the messages are permanently posted and archived. The chat (Slack-Tub Pub) is immediate but the record of it temporary. The Guru's Den is where I and several others answer your questions to us.

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Monday, 07/27/98 16:00:00 GMT


To all;
Centaur Forge Ltd. now has a new E-mail address for business communication.
It is centforge1 at aol.com
My personal E-address will stay the same

Bill Pieh -- wpieh at aol.com - Sunday, 11/01/98 05:13:39 GMT


Jock:

Seems to me this page would be good for groups to post upcoming events related to Blacksmithing. Thus the Virtual Hammer-in will lead people to non-cyberspace hammer-ins, etc. I could check my Blacksmith's Guild of the Potomac for upcoming events, and the others could cover their necks of the wood. Been too quiet here lately, and this might be a good evolution. Non-technical but useful information.

We've got some Norwegian blacksmiths from the "Viking Village" who are supposed to be coming over for a demonstration at DC's Union Station ("A Norwegian Christmas" featuring one or both of our vessels) in December. Further details as they are worked out.

Cool and partly cloudy on the banks of the Potomac.

Visit your National Parks: www.nps.gov

Come have a row with us: www.wam.umd.edu/~eowyn/Longship/
(cASE sENSITIVE) :-)

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- bruce_blackistone at nps.gov - Thursday, 11/05/98 16:28:03 GMT


OK Bruce Blackstone. Here's your first one. The Upper Midwest Blacksmiths' Association is having their annual meeting/Christmas/Thanksgiving/hammer-in/potluck dinner Tomorrow (Saturday Nov 7, 1998) in Burlington Wisconsin at Centaur Forge Ltd. Tel 414-763-9175, FAX is 414-763-8350.
All are invited and if you are not UMBA members you are welcome to join. Burlington is southwest of Milwaukee or northwest of Chicago.
Weather is clear and cool. The sun is out and it is nice here on the banks of the Fox river. Welcome to Wisconsin!
Bill Pieh

Bill Pieh -- wpieh at aol.com - Friday, 11/06/98 21:34:35 GMT


Okay, Bill:

I'll see your Upper Midwest Blacksmith's Guild Annual Meeting and Free-for-All, and raise you a Blacksmith's Guild of the Potomac Christmas Show and Sale at 18400 Muncaster Road in Derwood, Maryland. (A little north of Rockville, which is up Rt. 270, nrthwest of the District of Columbia.) Hours are 10:-4:00 Saturday and Sunday. $5 per car, but any budding smiths in the Baltimore/Washington area could probably talk their way in. (Then again, if you can't cover $5, maybe you should take up and even cheaper hobby.) BGOP contact is Ken Zastrow at 301-622-0897.
(Alas, I'm tied to the farm this weekend.)

Cold and cloudy on the banks of the lower Potomac. Had our first frosts this week!

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- asylum at us.HSAnet.net - Saturday, 11/07/98 03:39:20 GMT


Okay Bill,
I live Madison, Wisconsin could you please send me info on The Upper Midwest Blacksmiths' Association. Thank you. You can send the info via E-Mail at arc at globaldialog.com

Michael (ARCMAN) Rosensteel -- arc at globaldialog.com - Saturday, 11/07/98 09:28:33 GMT


OK guys I need some help I found a piece of 6 thick plate at the scrap yard Im fixin to make a big damn anvil. My question is can I use 7018 build up rod under my hard surface rod or is it too spongy? And after I apply the hard facing rod (Royal 240) should I slow cool the thing? The specks on the rod dont say any thing on preheat or post heat or long cool time

BTW Have been employed as welder for 12 years never got to play with any hard rod. Will have enough for about 4 or 5 anvils

(Lon) Humphrey -- lhumphrey at ee.net - Saturday, 11/07/98 21:03:32 GMT


I am looking to get started weaponsmithing but I need to find a quality forge but I don't know where to get started. How can I locate a good forge and what will I need to do to set up my first shop?

Steve -- SMClausen at aol.com - Saturday, 11/07/98 22:41:49 GMT


I like McKay 886 (or 86) for buildup on anvils Hard rod is too brittle. Better too soft than too hard. Question; what is the steel; A-36, or what? If Manganese steel, be sure to preheat to 600 deg. F. and keep it there until done. You should use at least 250 Amps, DC-reverse. Peen between passes. (Or you can just buy a new one.)

Bill Pieh -- wpieh at aol.com - Sunday, 11/08/98 04:54:56 GMT


Regarding Upper Midwest Blacksmiths' Association (UMBA) membership. Too bad we didn't get to you sooner. We had a good time, as usual. UMBA had about 75 registered, not counting spouses and kids. One head count has over 110 there. Dues are $15.00 per year. send dues to UMBA 1026 Tappan St. Woodstock, Illinois. 60098

Bill Pieh -- wpieh at aol.com - Sunday, 11/08/98 05:09:23 GMT


I would like to know if there is any danger cutting a OX bottle wiih a torch ? It has the valve out of it. It's been out for about a week. The bottle was a junker but it had a little pressure, just enough to hear. Thanks Bob

Robert Kern -- R.W.Kern at juno.com - Monday, 11/09/98 03:01:12 GMT


Robert, I wouldn't even try.
It doesn't need to contain gas you will supply it with your torch (the gas will never burn completely) and it WILL explode at a certain fuel oxygen mixture even a abrasive cut-off saw may cause a explosion if you cut the tank (dust explosion).
I would use a band saw (or hack saw even) instead at least until it is completely open.
Hope you will be carefull.
Regards OErjan

OErjan -- osa0219 at komvux.skelleftea.se - Monday, 11/09/98 07:46:07 GMT


Robert;I agree with OErjan,use a band saw.If you have to use a torch to cut that tank,then purge the tank with nitrogen or some other inert gas before and during the cutting.Cut in small encrements so as not to allow a gas build up in the tank.BE CAREFUL
-8C under clear northern lite filled skies on the Alaska Hwy.

dimag -- dimag at yt.sympatico.ca - Monday, 11/09/98 14:53:44 GMT


I wouldn't even do that I had a nasty accident a few year back.
A friend cut a 6mm steel plate with a bowl shape in it about 300mm deep it was propped up about 100mm on one end but some how there was a explosion and he got a sever third degree when his overall leg caught fire.it didn't exactly get any cooler when he ran around with the burning cloth (Think of a fan and a fire :-( you know like in a forge)

Oerjan -- osa0219 at komvux.skelleftea.se - Monday, 11/09/98 15:30:33 GMT


It was suposed to say"I wouldn't even do that a friend had a nasty accident a few year back.
A friend cut a 6mm steel plate with a bowl shape in it about 300mm deepand 1500mm wide it was propped up about 100mm on one end but some how there was a explosion and he got a sever third degree when his overall leg caught fire.it didn't exactly get any cooler when he ran around with the burning cloth (Think of a fan and a fire :-( you know like in a forge)"
I some how posted vithout knowing. I hadnt even read and corected it yet.Sorry

Oerjan -- osa0219 at komvux.skelleftea.se - Monday, 11/09/98 15:34:49 GMT


Robert: Oxygen by itself will not burn or explode. Mixed with fuel gas is a different matter-- very dangerous!!! If I absolutely had to cut a tank or bottle, I would fill it with water, then start my cut at the opening, and cut the top off.

grandpa -- darylmeier at usa.net - Monday, 11/09/98 15:45:21 GMT


TANKS and TORCHES: Orjan was absolutely RIGHT about the gas comming from your torch! Never cut ANY type of hollow container with an oxy-acetylene torch unless the container has a hole big enough to ventilate the container (such as a manway). The ventilation MUST be forced such as from an approved close quarters ventilation fan.

Grandpa's suggestion to fill the container with water is a tried and true method as long as there is not a significant air space above the water. His comment about Oxygen is dead on (non-flamable, it being only half the equation), however pure Oxygen accelerates the combustion of common items like clothing and wiring. We would not have lost three brave American astronauts if they had not had a pure oxygen atmosphere in their early space capsule. It was a stupid accident that happened because our space program was in a hurry. Being in a hurry is why most "stupid" shop accidents occur. Slow down and THINK when working!

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Tuesday, 11/10/98 04:16:26 GMT


Steve -- SMClausen at aol.com, Check out the forges on the Centaur Forge page http://www.anvilfire.com/centaur. Centaur carries a full line of blacksmithing books, tools and forges. I've posted about getting started at least once a week for the past 6 months on the GURU page includeing a couple times last month about sword smithing!

Weapons smithing is the high art of blacksmithing. Start at the beginning with general blacksmithing THEN study metalurgy (alloys, heat treatment. . .) See my article on Learning Blacksmithing on the 21st Century page. I'm working on a new one but it will do.

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Tuesday, 11/10/98 04:28:42 GMT


I am looking for a set of plans for an inexpensive but effective "junk yard/home built" power hammer. Something that with approx. 30# + ram, electric motor driven (not air compressor powered), compact design to fit in a small shop. Something that will save the elbow!

Joe Boland -- JLBBJS at AOL.COM - Tuesday, 11/10/98 19:00:25 GMT


We've been working on that. However, specific PLANS and JUNK YARD do not mix. I'm working on a design guide with several examples but specific plans can be problematic. To be specific, the exact "junk" parts would be required. Everything from mechanical parts to scrap materials. The whole "junk yard" approach is to make do with whatever happens your way, CHEAP. If you investigate the stories of the Junk Yard Hammers here and elsewhere you will find that we used what came our way. You start with an idea, then scrounge for parts and materials, then modify your idea to suit the parts found.

I could easily design a small mechanical hammer but then you would be locked into a stock list and specific mechanical abilities including the need for machine tools. A small lathe and a good drill press (minimum). Take a look at the pictures of the the South African power hammer (Power hammer Page and NEWS). These guys had access to a lot of machinery and were very talented. The result is a fairly good machine.

NO AIR COMPRESSOR??: Compressed air is an important tool in modern shops. Not only is it used to run power hammers but hand held air chisels and die grinders, spray painting equipment and small sand blasting setups. Air cylinders can also be applied to power VISES and special clamping rigs. Many gas forges used compressed air instead of blowers.

BACK to that HOME BUILT HAMMER: While I (or you) are working on plans keep an eye out for HEAVY steel. 7,8 or 10" round or plate stock for a power hammer anvil. Structurals ( I-beam, wide flange, channel) and pipe, the bigger and heavier the better. And you can NEVER have enough angle iron (of every size). Then keep an eye out for pillow blocks, motors pulleys. . . Cheap means taking opertunities as they present themselves.

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Tuesday, 11/10/98 23:35:59 GMT


NW Smiths -- (Washington & Oregon)

This weekend, Saturday, Nov 14 and Sun. Nov 15 Peter Ross will be demonstrating at Historic Fort Vancouver.

(you guys back east don't need to read this part)
Peter Ross is one of the best Colonial Era smiths in the country today. He is the head blacksmith at Colonial Williamsburg. He's
been at Ft. Vancouver before, and reports of his demonstrations have been uniformly that "he's great."

Demos will run from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM both days.

Cost -- $35 for both days or $20 for a single day. Proceeds go to the Blacksmith's Guild at the Fort. They need the support!

I can't afford it, but plan to be there anyway (peanut butter sandwiches next week). Hope you can make it.

Morgan

Morgan Hall -- morganh at teleport.com - Wednesday, 11/11/98 14:42:57 GMT


NW Smiths -- (Washington & Oregon)

This weekend, Saturday, Nov 14 and Sun. Nov 15 Peter Ross will be demonstrating at Historic Fort Vancouver.

(you guys back east don't need to read this part)
Peter Ross is one of the best Colonial Era smiths in the country today. He is the head blacksmith at Colonial Williamsburg. He's
been at Ft. Vancouver before, and reports of his demonstrations have been uniformly that "he's great."

Demos will run from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM both days.

Cost -- $35 for both days or $20 for a single day. Proceeds go to the Blacksmith's Guild at the Fort. They need the support!

I can't afford it, but plan to be there anyway (peanut butter sandwiches next week). Hope you can make it.

Morgan

Morgan Hall -- morganh at teleport.com - Wednesday, 11/11/98 14:43:18 GMT


Looking to buy a Power Hammer. 25-50 pound, in reasonable condition.

Bob Boyd -- Bboyd26347 at aol.com - Saturday, 11/14/98 07:27:22 GMT


looking for a large cone about 12-15 inches at bottom and about 3.5'tall only seen one and would love to have one please e-mail if you know where one is im in colorado.

mark lansdon -- weird101 at bewellnet.com - Sunday, 11/15/98 03:31:44 GMT


I just found your page while looking for craft info in my area. Typing "blacksmithing" in the search window got nothing. I just retired from ford mo.co. after 35 years and I'm trying to get something going to make a few bucks extra for play money. I've been smithing about 30 years with a few semenars for ideas. A few books are in my library and the "feast of the harvest moon" & friendship nmlra shoots have helped with finding other smiths. I think your web site will be a blessing. Thanks a slack tub full!

jerry -- birdlegs at keynet.net - Sunday, 11/15/98 07:06:58 GMT


Jerry, I wonder what search engine you are using? We were #1 on Lycos and Hotbot a few months ago. I've submitted to Yahoo dozens of times and finally got a burried listing under arts/crafts/rec/news for the anvilfire news. But we come up in the first 10 or 20 in a dozen or so search engines! Maybe I need to check again and resubmit!

Glad you found us in any case! Look around. There is a LOT here and I will be editing and posting many new articles after the first of the year when I finish the temporary job I am working.
------------------------
Had a great time with the folks from the Cnetral Virginia Blacksmiths Guild yesterday. Will post a new volume of the news when I get home.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Sunday, 11/15/98 13:16:36 GMT


Something to add to your busy schedules. (You can probably just attend.)

*********************************************************************

1999 IRONMASTERS CONFERENCE
APRIL 23-25, 1999

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY
MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA

Call for Papers

The West Virginia University Institute for the History of
Technology and Industrial Archaeology in cooperation with the
Society for Industrial Archeology Three Rivers Chapter is pleased
to announce that the 1999 Ironmasters Conference will be held on
the campus of West Virginia University April 23-25, 1999. This
three day conference will feature an early bird Friday tour of
the operating and historic regional iron and steel industry
sites, paper sessions on Saturday, and a Sunday tour of the
standing remains of northern West Virginia's charcoal iron
industry. The paper selection committee is actively seeking
paper proposals related to historic ironmaking, iron mining, and
other iron and steel-related topics. Professionals and non-
professional alike are urged to submit a paper proposal.
Abstracts should be two-hundred words or less, and the speakers
are allotted twenty minutes per presentation. Proposals are due
by December 31, 1998.

For more information or to submit a paper proposal, contact Lee
Maddex at phone: (304)293-3829; fax: (304)293-2449; or email:
LMaddex at wvu.edu

*******************************************************************
Lee R. Maddex, Project Coordinator, Sr.
Institute for the History of Technology and Industrial Archaeology
West Virginia University, PO Box 6305, Morgantown, WV 26506-6305
phone: (304)293-3829; fax: (304)293-2449; email: lmaddex at wvu.edu
"Any man that eats chili can't be all bad."
Pat Garrett, speaking of Billy the Kid, 1880
*******************************************************************

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- bruce_blackistone at nps.gov - Monday, 11/16/98 19:26:06 GMT


WANTED: large-- 8-inch or so bite-- cross vise for monster drill press. U.S.-made, good condition, no wobble or wiggle, like maybe a Dayton, etc. REASONABLE! Prefer to see it-- within reach of Santa Fe-- first. Many thanks. Great site, Jock!

John Neary -- jneary at roadrunner.com - Friday, 11/20/98 04:19:36 GMT


Ah, He's got it running. NOW he needs a big vise! Yep, those old drill presses will break your arm (or worse) if you don't clamp down the work!

John, you might consider a milling machine vise. Would you believe they are more common than good drill press vises? The size to fit a Bridgeport mill works well.

Jock Dempsey - Saturday, 11/21/98 05:15:35 GMT


Not an arm--yet-- but would you believe a thumb that doesn't quite work on account of a 1/4-inch drill breaking the work away from a C-clamp that gave me religion? Anyway: will a milling machine vise give that x-y axes tweaking capability that a cross-vise affords? If so, anybody got a big one they want to sell? Many thanks.

john neary -- jneary at roadrunner.com - Saturday, 11/21/98 05:37:34 GMT


No, milling vises bolt to the mill's table which is part of the X-Y motion of the machine.

I use an old Wilton drill press vise and "furniture" much like on a milling machine is used just as often. This is composed of hand forged "U" clamps made from 1/2" square bar, heavy support washers, various length bolts and plain nuts or a few "T" nuts. Stacks of spacers sawed from various thickness of 2" stock finish up the set. For special jobs drilling round stock I also made several "V" blocks from angle iron and channel!

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Saturday, 11/21/98 21:03:53 GMT


Umm, Jock.... My several-year-old Grainger catalog No. 381 lists one (Wilton) milling table-- for $1,514.58!!!! By contrast, an 8-inch Dayton cross-vise was going for $185.40.

John Neary -- jneary at roadrunner.com - Sunday, 11/22/98 02:54:39 GMT


I am a welding instructor for a Com. College. I have been in the orn.iron work for 20 years. I am glad to find you on the internet. It is great to see others interested in the samethings. Wonderful web page keep up the good work.

Roger Wright -- rlwright at mdcc.cc.ms.us - Monday, 11/23/98 19:24:55 GMT


Thanks Roger! I learned welding at a community college and its one of the things I reccomend would be smiths to do. The safety lessons learned in that environment are more important than the welding!

John, the vise I have is a lot cheaper than that new! Mine came from the flea market for $25. X-Y table ARE expensive. I find it plenty easy to rotate the table and swivel it back and forth. You can't mill on the drill press nor hold milling machine position accuracy so an expensive X-Y table is a waste of money.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Monday, 11/23/98 23:05:32 GMT


i am a beginer at blacksmithing could somebody give me some advice to help me start to make swords

dan - Tuesday, 11/24/98 00:09:35 GMT


Dan, sword making is the ultimate of blacksmithing. It requires forging skills, welding skills, knowledge of metalurgy and some engineering (strength of materials). Centaur Forge carries all of Jim Hrisoulas's books on blacksmithing, knife making, Damascus and sword making. I'd recomend ALL of them for a start. You also need good general blacksmithing reference and one of the best is Jack Andrews' NEW Edge of the Anvil. If you are serious about knives and swords you will also need ASM's ASM Metals Reference and perhaps their Heat Treaters Guide. Check out the Centaur page and order one of their catalogs, the ASM web site is on our links page.

Along with the knowledge you will also need some grinding equipment (besides the usual blacksmithing equipment). Although some knife makers make knives entirely by grinding (stock removal), forged blades still need a lot of grinding and polishing. The books above will show you what kind of machinery you will need. Forging a sword is a LOT of work so I also recomend a power hammer.

I regularly answer questions on the Guru page if you need any more help.

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Tuesday, 11/24/98 00:39:07 GMT


migawd but you blacksmiths are stronnnng! Not counting whatever it is I am drilling into at the moment, the table alone on this mother must weigh 150 pounds, and rotating it is bad enough, but then swinging it from port to starboard and locking and unlocking and raising and lowering and trying to get the point smack on the center-punch and then unlocking and trying again... sheesh! When I know there is a nice old cross vise out there that somebody's machinist grand-daddy left and nobody's using and that could be packed up and sent here where it would have a good home....

john neary -- jneary at roadrunner.com - Tuesday, 11/24/98 03:52:56 GMT


john,

Have you checked the Harbor Freight Catalog?

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Tuesday, 11/24/98 13:01:58 GMT


OK guys, Where can I find/order some Casenite? I've checked with every welding/steel supplier in town. A couple of them didn't even know what it was!

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Wednesday, 11/25/98 01:41:42 GMT


Jim: Dixie Gun Works used to carry casenite. Brownells Gunsmithing supplies is another choice. 65f and clear in the heartland.

grandpa -- darylmeier at usa.net - Wednesday, 11/25/98 01:50:37 GMT


John, just how BIG is this drill press? Maybe some oil would help? You should be able to push the table side to side with just a little nudge when unlocked. The table should SPIN free when IT is unlocked. Cranking the table UP can be a little work :) All the 20/21" drill presses I've got work pretty smooth.

Now the 10 foot tall monster one with the 3 foot table table I've got an eye on. . . .

Jock Dempsey - Thursday, 11/26/98 03:27:57 GMT


Greetings fellow blacksmiths

Ive just got my hands on pneumatic hammer made by B&S Massey Ltd. at
Manchester probably sometimes in the early 1950s. The type of the hammer is 3.cwt and its blow capasity is 170 full blows per minute. Its fully operational and comes with the original Ellison electric start unit.

Hammer hasnt been in use for three years so Im planning to do full
maintenance service for it. If any fellow blacksmiths have original
maintenance/installing manuals for this kind of hammer/start unit or have knowledge where I could find them please inform me. Probably the machine works that made it isnt operational any more. Also if you have experience about proper maintaining of the unit please contact. It sure is a beautiful piece of old machinery and deserves the best possible care.

Thanks

Antti Salminen
blacksmith
Kurkisuontie 14 A 8
00940 Helsinki 94
FINLAND
EUROPE
email:antsalmi at uiah.fi

Antti Salminen -- antsalmi at uiah.fi - Friday, 11/27/98 14:36:41 GMT


well, yes, it does swing and spin freely, I confess, but after the first 20 or 30 times of a session, the magic begins to wear off and one finds oneself yearning for the easy convenience a cross-vise-- at least, this one does. And, hey, I love that "all the 20-21-inch drill presses I've got...." How's that for a throw-away exit line?

john neary -- jneary - Sunday, 11/29/98 05:17:39 GMT


Well. . . I got carried away. And bought every one of these old beauties (20" geared head, flat belt drive drill presses) I could find. Hmmmm, I'll have to count. 1,2,3,4 . . . Thats all. One is running, two need single phase motors (one got trashed in a flood) and the last machine is a block of rust but is probably the best of the four. . . Oh, yeah I also have a small production type machine of the same era. It has a big flat table that only adjusts up and down and is dedigned for drill jig use. I use it for wood working.

Three of the four 20" machines will eventualy be setup side by side. They all take the same tooling (same spindle taper and furniture). For the odd production job each would have a different tool (Drill, counter bore, chamfer. The last machine (really worn out, table like the craters of the moon, will go in the blacksmith shop.

These old machines are a bargain. The most I paid for one was $350 US and it came with over $1,000 worth of drills! New equivalent machines cost $3000-$5000.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Sunday, 11/29/98 14:30:38 GMT


mahwah nj was just invaded by a horde of black knights. I saved all thair butts with my handy-dandy two-handed broadsword of death hot off my forge!!!!!!!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
bye bye

Lord Demetrius -- lister at rockpile.com - Monday, 11/30/98 18:48:54 GMT


What the **** was that?

Olle Andersson -- utgaardaolle at ebox.tninet.se - Monday, 11/30/98 22:15:58 GMT


Little Giant 50# For Sale.... getting funds together to study at art academy. Rebuilt hammer bronze axle babbit, new dies runs great. Asking 2800.00 located in North Carolina email SuzanneFe at hotmail.com or call 828 765 6512

Suzanne J.L. -- SuzanneFe at hotmail.com - Tuesday, 12/01/98 04:04:46 GMT


Little Giant 50# For Sale.... getting funds together to study at art academy. Rebuilt hammer bronze axle babbit, new dies runs great. Asking 2800.00 located in North Carolina email SuzanneFe at hotmail.com or call 828 765 6512

Suzanne J.L. -- SuzanneFe at hotmail.com - Tuesday, 12/01/98 04:13:58 GMT


Can someone tell me the address or URL to find the plans for an
compressed air operated hammer? IN the picture I can't find the assembly was painted green. How do I find these plans??????
Thanks,
Bob


Bob Dyke -- dyke at tcity.com - Wednesday, 12/02/98 00:48:25 GMT


Bob this address has a control scheme for the ABANA Ron Kinyon air hammer.

http://www.bham.net/afc/techniques/airhammer.html

The Ron Kinyon plans are available from ABANA. Similar hammers are shown in our NEWS coverage of the ABANA conference and Power hammer Page. We may be posting plans in the future but do not currently have any available.

The basics. An air cylinder with 10 to 15x the ram weight in push. A guided ram (see JYH supplement to the NEWS) an anvil with 10 to 15x the weight of the ram and a frame to hold it all in position (A big hunk of beam 30-75#). A pilot type switch cycles the 4 way control valve. An exhust valve triggers the motion (see diagram from AFC site). Cylinders can be bought new or used. Valves are best bought new and can be gotten from McMaster-Carr among other places.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Wednesday, 12/02/98 03:39:25 GMT


50# little giant,#K7160, excellent condition with 3 full sets of extra dies, and custom dies included. This hammer is in operation and has been well maintained. I also have a 4 burner Johnson (old style) forge for sale.

Charlie McKinney -- mckinney at ixlmemphis.com - Sunday, 12/06/98 00:06:53 GMT


"0 GREAT ANVIL WIZARDS"-
I just bought an anvil a few hours ago at the "First Monday Trades
Day" in Canton Tx. It is
one I am not familar with. It is 22" long with a 3 1/4" face. It seems
to weigh around 100lbs. It has a
brass name tag riveted on one side, with the word
"REVONOC", and the company's name H.S.E. & Co. Also there is a large
inverted triangle with a "C" in it cast on one side.
On the opposite side is a raised "H". It rings out very well. It is not cast iron. It has a fairly wide forging line (not a sharp casting line). Has the numbers "17 15" stamped on the side with 1/2" hand stamps, in a type style used in early 1900-30s.
What have I got? Thanks for your
help! ...Gaddy!

Gene Gaddy -- gaddy1 at airmail.net - Sunday, 12/06/98 04:11:32 GMT


I forgot to price the hammer & forge. They are $3000. and $1000. My work # is 901-947-6484, Memphis, TN.

Charlie McKinney -- mckinney at ixlmemphis.com - Sunday, 12/06/98 17:56:27 GMT


Have a Beaudry450-500 lb hammerremoved in working condition with all line shafting,oilers, wheels, century 220 single phase. Bought a shop from the old master smith at the GP mill here in town. Spring arms have been welded in the past, dies look very good, guides are very good, the anvil is separate from the main casting as it ha cracked years ago and the is a huge strap the connects the two, and the anvil was boldted under the hammer seprate. 4500.00 Have one cone anvil left,500.oo Guru, thank you for the site. DS

david Schiff -- dschiff at mcn.org - Tuesday, 12/08/98 05:52:59 GMT


Antti Salminen: B&S Massey Ltd. Manchester, England, is still in business. Their phone number is 161-223-4661 country code from her in the USA to England is 44. I'm sure you can get what you looking for from them. Tell B&S Massey you heard about them from the world wide web at www.anvilfire.com. The place to get your blacksmithing question answered with out censorship.

One other thing, you have yourself a great machine. If we can be of any other service to you please let us know. Good luck and happy hammering.

Bruce R. Wallace -- Walmewtalwk at aol.com - Tuesday, 12/08/98 17:52:37 GMT


looking for a turn of the century anvil..recreating a blacksmiths shop in Utah....

Jerry Tucker -- marbles at cyberhighway.net - Wednesday, 12/09/98 02:53:29 GMT


When I bought the old shop, It had a huge Champion Drill press, curved upper body, auto feed, #4taper shaft.Thing is over 6.5 feet tall. belt drive shaft with 3 stage pulley off to the left spins smooth, any ideas as to its worth if were to sell it? Also have a Royersford 21" belt drive auto feed, not as tall, fits into my small shop better. Dont know whether to keep them both or sell. the bigger one Any advice is appreciated. DS..

David Schiff -- dschiff at mcn.org - Wednesday, 12/09/98 03:49:31 GMT


Jerry,

Turn of the century would most probably be a London Pattern. Which is what most

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Wednesday, 12/09/98 15:04:27 GMT


"older" anvils here in America are. Richard Postman's book "ANVILS IN AMERICA" would be helpful to you. There is a review on the bookshelf here at Anvilfire.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Wednesday, 12/09/98 15:06:03 GMT


Does anybody know where I might be able to buy a used anvil in the 53 to 86 Lb range? I priced new ones and $500 + is more than I can spend.

John -- jashworth at snet.net - Wednesday, 12/09/98 21:11:21 GMT


John,

Check with Bruce Wallace. He'll be honest with you.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Wednesday, 12/09/98 21:24:31 GMT


CHAMPION DRILL should be very close to the same size as the Royersford. At least they did make one almost identical. In good condition these drills sell for $250 to $500. They are worth a lot more if you compare them to a modern machine that will do the same work. I'm always in the market . . .

TURN OF THE CENTURY ANVILS: Which Century? Anvils in 1900 were exactly the same as most standard anvils today. Matter of fact, most anvils in use today were made in the period from 1870 to 1930. Anvil styles are sort of like the violin. Once perfected there hasn't been much change.

SMALL ANVILS: Anvils less than 100 pounds are hard to come by and are more expensive (used) than the most common size range of 100 to 130 pounds. Big anvils (over 200 pounds) are also generaly more expensive.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Thursday, 12/10/98 03:14:38 GMT


John,

Let me ask a question that might have some bearing. What do you intend to do with the anvil?

I ask because you can frequently find 50# anvils that are made from cast iron for about $50. They aren't much good for blacksmithing (we tend to call them doorstops or boat anchors) but they do have some mass. The working surface will ding up pretty rapidly, but it will work harden SOME. If you surface it, it'll just ding up again because you'll have ground off the hardened surface.

I used one for about five years as a "show anvil". I carried it to shows to use, since it was lighter and easier to load in the truck.

But let the word get around, and you may be suprised at what comes your way. I've gotten two anvils in the last two years. Both slightly over 100#. One cost me $115, the other a couple of my kids got for $25 from a guy that didn't know what he had.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.netJo - Thursday, 12/10/98 03:34:31 GMT


Is anyone in the U.S. making wrought iron these days? And if not, isn't there enough interest for the product with the slow resurgence of blacksmithing arts? I'm very new to the metal world but everyone I ask locally tells me it is no longer produced in quantity, at least in this country.

David Claman -- claman at darkwing.uoregon.edu - Monday, 11/30/98 19:45:31 GMT


I've heard of people making wrought iron and a few importing it, however I can not currently find specifics.

The problem with making wrought iron is that the last process used (the puddling process) is very labor intensive. A worker stands in front of a liquid pool of iron heated by the heat radiating from the top of the furnace. The worker rakes the skin of pure iron that forms on the top of the pool due to its slightly higher melting point. He collects enough to make a ball and then passes that on to be forged (and forge welded) into a cohesive mass. This is then forged into heavy bars and rolled into sheet or smaller bar stock.

There is no automated manufacture of wrought iron like there is of mild steel which even though there is some demand for wrought it would still have to compete with mild steel in many cases.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Friday, 12/11/98 23:09:48 GMT



Looking for a 25 - 50 pound Little Giant, preferably in the Seattle area...anyone?

Bob -- bboyd26347 at aol.com - Saturday, 12/12/98 22:28:54 GMT


I WAS GIVEN 900LB.OF USED HIGHWAY DIAMOND TIP SAWBLADES .125 THICK X 3 FOOT TALL . WAS WONDERING WHAT TYPE STEEL THEY MIGHT BE?

LEE COLE -- pcole1 at bellsouth.net - Sunday, 12/13/98 05:42:46 GMT


Lee,

Grandpa or the Guru will be able to give you a nomenclature. I can't do that, but I can tell you that they're made out of darn good steel!

900 lbs?? bellsout.net? Where do you live? Wanta sell one or two of those blades? (grin)

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Monday, 12/14/98 00:22:21 GMT


Jim gives me too much credit. . . These blades will probably be the same as most insert type saw blades. Since the steel doesn't do the cutting it really doesn't have to be super good stuff but it won't be mild steel! Are there any diamonds left? Everyone needs a diamond for dressing grinding wheels! The prices for diamond dressers are surprisingly low but it sounds like you may have a BUNCH of them.

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Monday, 12/14/98 03:41:06 GMT


ANVIL STOLEN
looking to replace stolen anvil{who would steal a anvil}
living in southern ohio dont want to travel too far,hoping to find one close
any help greatly appreciated

scot harris -- sjharris at bright.net - Monday, 12/14/98 04:14:32 GMT


Scot,

Some folks will steal anything that isn't nailed down. And some collectors are paying big bucks for anvils. Guy in Georgia had FIVE stolen from his dad's barn a few months ago.

Sorry to hear about your loss. Will keep my eyes open, may find one in the area. What size are you looking for?

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Monday, 12/14/98 04:33:04 GMT


Scot: I have been there.
I have lost two anvils that way(the second time they broke evry thing they could't take with them).
its a growing problem here to(by the way I live in sweden).

OErjan -- osa0219 at komvux.skelleftea.se - Monday, 12/14/98 07:29:14 GMT


Imagine a lathebed and a sledgehammer meeting at high velocity.
Or a brick forge under the same conditions.
Or a pair of bellows...
I almost have to start over from scratch (I managed to salvage most of the damage).
keep trying and good luck.

OErjan -- osa0219 at komvux.skelleftea.se - Monday, 12/14/98 11:42:14 GMT


OErjan,

When did all this happen? And I thought

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited,net - Monday, 12/14/98 13:44:36 GMT


(Hit the wrong key!)

WE had problems with crime!

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Monday, 12/14/98 13:46:35 GMT


UPCOMING EVENT

Saturday and Sunday, December 19 & 20, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm at Union Station in Washington, DC. As part of the Norwegian Christmas celebration, several reenactors, including their blacksmith, from the "Viking Village" in Norway will be demonstrating. They might be doing anything from pot hooks to pattern welding, but I'm looking forward to meeting them. We have our faering boat on display, and if all goes well, the 32' 12 oar FYRDRACA will be parked out front. Look for the black and yellow sail. I should be there Saturday, if anyone wants to say hello, and our folks will be doing their own demonstrations on both days.

Come have a row with us: www.wam.umd.edu/~eowyn/Longship/ (cASE sENSITIVE)

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- asylum at us.HSAnet.net - Monday, 12/14/98 13:50:23 GMT


The 50# hammer I listed sold today.
Thanks,
Charlie

Charlie McKinney -- mckinney at ixlmemphis.com - Tuesday, 12/15/98 01:18:01 GMT


Jim.
It happened this spring. My blacksmith shop has been burgled more than 15 times(I have stop counting) since it was made in 1990.
All the police can do is drive past now and then and check.
All my tools are stamped deeeply with my mark (not the anvil but I welded my name on the side of it with stainless electrode and ground down flush before painting though).
All they ever get for it is some half finished blades and a few tools, and I get to put a new lock in the door(oh by the way anybody tried to get an insurance with this kind of history. If not save your self the trouble it won't work)
I have started too take home all tools and other valuable items it realy gives my bicycle a full load (no drivers licence. very short and stupid story).

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Tuesday, 12/15/98 11:13:34 GMT


last spring (stil no lathe or anvil )
my shop has ben burgled 15+ (I don't count anymore) times since it was started in 1990.
all the police can do is a few sporadic drive bys to checkbut thats it.
The only thing that has ben stolen of any great value is the anvis and some antique gunparts (bad enough).
And I have a pile of broken doorlocks (I do some locksmithing for friends and so), vises,... to take spares from and lots of broken fire bric to make experimenal forges with. If life gives you a lemon tree make lemonade!
I always mark my tools deeply with my stamp OR veld my name with stainles wire and repaint after grinding flush at least where it is possible.

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Tuesday, 12/15/98 11:46:39 GMT


last spring (stil no lathe or anvil )
my shop has ben burgled 15+ (I don't count anymore) times since it was started in 1990.
all the police can do is a few sporadic drive bys to checkbut thats it.
The only thing that has ben stolen of any great value is the anvis and some antique gunparts (bad enough).
And I have a pile of broken doorlocks (I do some locksmithing for friends and so), vises,... to take spares from and lots of broken fire bric to make experimenal forges with. If life gives you a lemon tree make lemonade!
I always mark my tools deeply with my stamp OR veld my name with stainles wire and repaint after grinding flush at least where it is possible.

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Tuesday, 12/15/98 11:46:51 GMT


last spring (stil no lathe or anvil )
my shop has ben burgled 15+ (I don't count anymore) times since it was started in 1990.
all the police can do is a few sporadic drive bys to checkbut thats it.
The only thing that has ben stolen of any great value is the anvis and some antique gunparts (bad enough).
And I have a pile of broken doorlocks (I do some locksmithing for friends and so), vises,... to take spares from and lots of broken fire bric to make experimenal forges with. If life gives you a lemon tree make lemonade!
I always mark my tools deeply with my stamp OR veld my name with stainles wire and repaint after grinding flush at least where it is possible.

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Tuesday, 12/15/98 11:50:01 GMT


test - OREjan, as you see your posts did go through. I had this trouble once. Will have to check it out

JDD -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Tuesday, 12/15/98 13:05:30 GMT


HEllo MY father has ben into balcksmithing for about 3 years now he has his own forge and shop complete with a powerhammer. He is computer illiterate so I am trying to find somee in newyork that also shares his hobbie. if there is any one in or around NY please E-mail me

James S. Fee -- JFee1217 at webtv.net - Tuesday, 12/15/98 13:54:47 GMT


OErjan,

That has got to be the pits! You might as well stop locking the door

Could you build a small trailer for the bicycle? That might make it a LITTLE easier.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Tuesday, 12/15/98 14:13:41 GMT


James S. Fee,

Go to http://www.abana.org

Click on the Chapters section, and you should be able to locate the contact person for the New York branch of ABANA.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Tuesday, 12/15/98 14:16:08 GMT


I want to buy several tools- trip hammer, little giant, murray hammer,and wrought ron.

Shannon Wolford -- Shewolf90 at hotmail.com - Wednesday, 12/16/98 01:45:04 GMT


It's me again, I am looking for those different kinds of tools for my dad's christmas present... Please help me! Anyone in Texas??

Shannon -- Shewolf90 at hotmail.com - Wednesday, 12/16/98 01:48:51 GMT


my poem is called black iron masters,i am very new to this or any-other computer,but would you like to see my poem?

dragons breath forge -- mrmule - Wednesday, 12/16/98 02:08:28 GMT


I am looking for a good resource on hand tools, tongs, hammers, forging suppies etc. Any info would be greatly appriciated!

Dave Richer -- EarthnIron at Aol.com - Wednesday, 12/16/98 05:03:04 GMT


Jim:
I already have one but try to have a 350-450 # (thats my approx. load) on a bicycle-trailer and go forward (takes really strong legs in a slope).
I mean steel weighs lots and I have quite a collection of tools.
Some hammers and a few sledge hammers all weighing from 10oz - 20#, a swage block 127#, a fair collection of tongs, chisels, flatters, a pair of bellows...... it ads up.
All I leave is a brick forge and a bench made in place on four poles driven 4-5 feet into the ground(I even take the vises home)
I have broken 5 or 6 chains this way but its still cheaper than leaving it to be stolen.
Thanks any way for the advice I have only a very simple (home-made) lock now, they dont need to brake so much when getting in and it keeps honest people out of harm (a brick forge keeps the heat for a looong time and so does oil after hardening for a whole day)

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Wednesday, 12/16/98 08:53:48 GMT


OErjan,

Yes, getting that much of a load/mass started would be a real bear, especially on a slope. And tools add up in a hurry. Just a durn shame you have to go to all that much trouble.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Wednesday, 12/16/98 13:54:42 GMT


I agree with OErjan regarding cutting the O2 bottle. Use a band saw. Or trade the bottle for an equal diameter piece of pipe.

James -- jartar at flash.net - Wednesday, 12/16/98 17:07:48 GMT


Hey Shannon, Where in Texas?

James Ryan -- jartar at flash.net - Wednesday, 12/16/98 17:30:26 GMT


OErjan: Does your shop that is vandalized and burgled have electricity? Does it have any neighbors close by?

grandpa -- darylmeier at usa.net - Wednesday, 12/16/98 17:38:37 GMT


mrmule, Dragons breath forge. Sure we would like to see a blacksmithing poem!

OErjan, I think you need to take a blacksmiths approach to the break in problem and build yourself a VAULT door! Wish we could help you directly rather than just give moral support.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Wednesday, 12/16/98 23:43:11 GMT


Jock,

Building a vualt door might not solve OErjan's problem. Even if he completely encased his building in 1/2

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Thursday, 12/17/98 00:12:03 GMT


Dammit! I do that almost every time I try to post in here!

To reiterate:

Even if he completely encased his building in 1/2" steel, they could/would use a cutting torch, just to see what he had inside.

My approach is simpler.

First you buy a 12 gauge, semi-auto, shotgun. H & K makes a real nice one. Then you start spending random nights in your shop. When they pick the WRONG night to break in, you........

Need I say more????????????

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Thursday, 12/17/98 00:15:14 GMT


Blacksmithing is a new challenge and information on anvilfireis unlimited.

Robert Montgomery -- mstables at fastdata.net - Thursday, 12/17/98 00:42:58 GMT


We've had some break-ins of our outbuildings at Oakley over the last few years. Believing Frederick the Great's dictum that "He who defends everything defends nothing." I've concentrated on fortifying the forge. Solid shutters on the outside and bars on the inside . The could still "mouse-hole" the cinderblock wallswith a sledge, or bash in through the padlocked and deadbolted door, but at least they have to work at it, and it should make a lot of noise. There's softer targets in the neighborhood, preferably on someone elses farm. What's really frustrating is you think you know who, but in our neck, there's too many candidates to be sure, so you're suspicious of too many folks, and that's the real tragedy.

Well, I hope OErjans gear turns up some day at a flea market, and he can recover it AND know who did it. At least his gear is marked (so's mine) so it might get back to him. Remember, you EXPORT your Vikings, don't keep them at home.

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- asylum at us.HSAnet.net - Thursday, 12/17/98 05:05:00 GMT


I've always had a habit of marking my tools. But for some reason, I've never marked my blacksmithing gear.

Recently I got a branding iron (little one) that reads PPW. And my "touch mark" is also PPW.

Guess what I've been using them for lately?

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Thursday, 12/17/98 07:26:25 GMT


Robert M.,

We weren't meaning to ignore you, just have been talking about security problems.

But you are right, blacksmithing is a new challenge. And that challenge continues over the years. Every piece of steel I pick up reacts just a little differently from the last one. The work is always challenging, always fun, (well, ALMOST always fun grin)and always rewarding.

A couple of simple rules can help to keep it that way.

1. Get it hot and hit it hard!

2. A blacksmith can only go to hell for either one of two reasons:
a. Not charging enough for his work.
b. Beating on cold iron.

Enjoy! Life is more fun that way!

mrmule.

Punch in your poem. Most of us will enjoy it.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Thursday, 12/17/98 07:32:08 GMT


Theyre nothing to hang in the Christmas tree (a direct translation from Swedish meaning they are no good)
I have better on my link page at. http://www.angelfire.com/ca/pokerbacken/bookmark.html
Look at the medieval section (right under the blacksmithing anchor)

Jock I have tried to burglar proof it with a very heavy hardwood door (2.5 thick) with heavy (riveted with washers, as long as the door was wide) strap hinges a heavy bar across (3by 1/2) all 3xx series steel, togheter with a sturdy padlock +a quality deadbolt lock. By the way the building is corrugated steel (1/16) on a angel iron framework.
Guess what, it didnt work, they demolished the place while trying to get in.

Grandpa, no electricity , I had a 10Hp twostroke engine for powering the lathe (it was an old one with pulleys) and a small 12V generator (for light and a jury-rigged cordless drill on a stand for drilling ), the closest neighbour lives 3-400yards away, through pine forest (I live two miles away ).
By the way grandpa remember the Swede you offered help (who I turned down but thanked for the offer and am still grateful) restart 1-1.5 years back, that was me thanks again.

Bruce, They most likely wont turn up (I think the marked ones are dumped in the river somewhere 10 fathoms and fast running) but if they do I hope he has a very good explanation to give the police. The armour sites in swedish are nothing to hang in the Christmas tree (a direct translation from Swedish meaning they are no good)
I have better on my link page at. http://www.angelfire.com/ca/pokerbacken/bookmark.html (I think you provided a few of them) Look at the medieval section (right under the blacksmithing anchor)

Jim, I own guns but they will just get me in prison, we are not even allowed to wrestle a burglar to the ground without him getting away from charges with some legal side-stepping and I will get a heavy fine for taking the law in my own hands. I have thought about it thug thogheter with mines, a mini clay more would solve the problem nicely, bear traps (With really big barbs) and a few others. Sorry Jim forgot to mention that I leave the charcoal there too in the last post (takes me a few hours to get 2-3 days supply for free).

Grandpa, Jock, Jim and all, thanks for the support, I manage fine with your moral support it helps tremendously to know others are in the background supporting.

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Thursday, 12/17/98 08:46:05 GMT


OErjan,

Here in the states we have it a little easier. Although the law does vary from state to state, if we occasionally sleep in the building, that makes it an occupied dwelling. Breaking into an occupied dwelling during the hours of darkness is a felony in most states and one is permitted to use "necessary" force to repel the felon. The amount of force that is "necessary" is of coourse debateable. But a dead man can't argue.

On the other hand, there are other methods. The claymore that you mention, a shotgun rigged to fire when the door is opened, etc. The shotgun is called a "wolf trap" here in the states and is illegal.

The law is a wierd creature.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Thursday, 12/17/98 15:49:27 GMT


Oerjan,
Why don't you get a large, loud dog? Maybe a German Shepherd or a Rottwieler.

David - Thursday, 12/17/98 16:31:12 GMT


I have been in the Forge business for 35 years and collecting Anvils most oy that time. They are mostly minitures, salesmen samples, addvertising etc. At last count I had over 70 different ones and was wondering if anyone else was into this hobby .

Russ Quinn -- RFINN007 at aol.com - Thursday, 12/17/98 16:46:03 GMT


Sold my little giant!! Thanks!!!

Suzanne J.L. -- SuzanneFe at hotmailcom - Thursday, 12/17/98 17:28:15 GMT


Sold my little giant!! Thanks!!!

Suzanne J.L. -- SuzanneFe at hotmailcom - Thursday, 12/17/98 17:36:23 GMT


I have ten, 20"x 1/8"x 1" chop saw blades that someone gave to me. I'm willing to return the favor and pass them on free to anyone who has a 20" chop saw. You pay the shipping.

Bruce R. Wallace -- Walmetalwk at aol.con - Thursday, 12/17/98 21:08:44 GMT


Does anyone out there know of any anvil manufacturres in the Czech Republic. I would like to find a source for import to Canada. Any help would be appreciated.

Bruce Armon -- armonk at cadvision.com - Friday, 12/18/98 03:56:57 GMT


Jim. I will actually not do nothing (at least not more than I have already), David, I am the kind of person that send dogs into a frenzie when I approach so I think Il skip the dog,
I will continue to do black smiting in the future as well despite the inconvenient interuptions.
It is very convenient to have the shop on a trailer for shows and demos (ask jock or Jim).
I am working hard to get that new anvil to get started anew and put all troubles behind me.
thanks for the suport.

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Friday, 12/18/98 08:31:26 GMT


OErjan,

Your decision is probably best, considering the circumstances.

I agree that the shop trailer is extremely handy for shows and demo's. I just have a difficult time visualizing moving it behind a bicycle. grin)

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Friday, 12/18/98 12:13:10 GMT


Thought I would let some ppl know, I'm selling 57 lb. cast iron anvils for 99. Manufactured in the USA, all new. We also have some 300 lb.
steel anvils brand new for 550. My friends in the SCA got us making them. We contacted a steel foundry and got them making the others for us. We are working on a 500 lb anvil per order only. it will be around 800. We make shield bosses out of aluminum if anyone is interested they are only 15. Well if anyone needs anything cast let us know we can generally make it or get it made at a great price. Merry Christmas and God Bless You.
Iron Garden Works 205-815-3604

Wes -- wesoneal at bellsouth.net - Friday, 12/18/98 18:35:17 GMT


Thought I would let some ppl know, I'm selling 57 lb. cast iron anvils for 99. Manufactured in the USA, all new. We also have some 300 lb.
steel anvils brand new for 550. My friends in the SCA got us making them. We contacted a steel foundry and got them making the others for us. We are working on a 500 lb anvil per order only. it will be around 800. We make shield bosses out of aluminum if anyone is interested they are only 15. Well if anyone needs anything cast let us know we can generally make it or get it made at a great price. Merry Christmas and God Bless You.
Iron Garden Works 205-815-3604

Wes -- wesoneal at bellsouth.net - Friday, 12/18/98 18:35:37 GMT


Okay, the truck's loaded, the ship's lashed down, and for good measure I packed my leather apron and safety glasses in my Viking tool chest and stuffed the double bellows in the cab. I shove off at 07:00 for the Norwegian event at Union Station (see posting above). Maybe I'll see some of y'all there.

Come have a row with us: www.wam.umd.edu/~eowyn/Longship/ (cASE sENSITIVE)

Visit you National Parks: www.nps.gov

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- asylum at us.HSAnet.net - Saturday, 12/19/98 03:31:31 GMT


Shoot! And I've got another short weekend! Take some pictures for me Bruce!

Jock Dempsey - Saturday, 12/19/98 03:46:51 GMT


I've just bought a 50 lb. Little Giant. My question is where do I pick up the rebuild book? Centaur dosen't carry it. I've e-mailed Skipjack but no responce yet. Anybody know?

Pete -- Ravnstudio at aol.com - Saturday, 12/19/98 22:40:44 GMT


Pete, the Kern Little Giant Book is supposed to be back in print soon but it is not. Norm Larson listed it in his new catalog and was dissapointed to not be able to deliver. We will likely be the first place to announce its availability. I have a copy and will post a review as soon as the book really IS back in print. I CAN tell you this, if you are looking for detailed dimensional information it is NOT in the Little Giant Book.

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Sunday, 12/20/98 00:44:23 GMT


Well, I worked my very first piece of wrought iron today. A friend gave me several feet of 3/4" rod. I cut off a foot to play with, before I start working on what I have to make. This stuff sure handles differently from mild steel!

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Sunday, 12/20/98 22:49:01 GMT


Jim.
Couldn't agree more, wrought is great (have quite some from a fire) to work with as long as you keep it HOT. Actually I'm spoiled al my wrought is the Swedish-Wrought (incredibly fine grain and almost no cold-shuts or slag and no sulphur).
I also have some shear steel and blister steel from another source (it handles like mild/1070-1095 laminate)
In all it's really great as long as you work with the grain in mind and don't forget to upset before drilling, IF AT ALL it's really sensitive about getting the grain broken that way (it loses much more in strength than ordinary mild that is drilled).
I have had a few surprises with them both (mild and wrought). I had a bar of mild wreck a carbide insert and the holder, yes I know it shouldn't but it did, why? It was a piece of a carbide insert imbedded in the steel. SURPRISE!!
Wrought. I had a piece of wrought brought it to temp and it flew apart in three pieces when the hammer hit, it was another nice surprise, it was tree pieces badly welded together not one.
By the way Jim it only takes longer to get there and I get some exercise in the bargain when I take my trailer to demos(and I agree it is a pain to get up a hill).

OErjan -- pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Monday, 12/21/98 07:41:13 GMT


I just thought you'd all be interested to know that the book (reviewed on this Web site), A Blacksmithing Primer: A Course in Basic and Intermediate Blacksmithing by Randy McDaniel is available for ordering over the Internet at http://mindancer.com/primer.

The site contains details on the book, the author, plus reviews and feedback from book dealers and people who own the book.

Thank you,

C. A. Casey -- casey at mindancer.com - Monday, 12/21/98 15:13:00 GMT


FOR SALE; flypresses,2 small and 2 large from 1600.00 to 2500.00, Pexto bench shear 36" pnuematic 1600.00, 25lb & 50lb. Little Giant 1800.00 & 2300.00, Globe brand hand shear on stand 100.00, 2 blacksmith helper with one 4140 die 200.00 each. Trying to clean out shop please help. Some prices negotiable and can be shipped. Please call me for details because I will respond faster than with e-mail. Thanks Andrew

Andrew Macdonald -- forge at siu.edu - Monday, 12/21/98 15:36:54 GMT


FOR SALE; flypresses,2 small and 2 large from 1600.00 to 2500.00, Pexto bench shear 36" pnuematic 1600.00, 25lb & 50lb. Little Giant 1800.00 & 2300.00, Globe brand hand shear on stand 100.00, 2 blacksmith helper with one 4140 die 200.00 each. Trying to clean out shop please help. Some prices negotiable and can be shipped. Please call me for details because I will respond faster than with e-mail. Thanks Andrew

Andrew Macdonald -- forge at siu.edu - Monday, 12/21/98 15:38:40 GMT


Sorry my phone number is (618)549-1954 and I live in southern Illinois Thanks again, Andrew

Andrew Macdonald -- forge at siu.edu - Monday, 12/21/98 15:45:50 GMT


PawPaw: Have you invented any new curse words while working that wrought iron?

grandpa -- darylmeier at usa.net - Monday, 12/21/98 17:28:24 GMT


Re Shop Security. I live on the same property as my shop so no problem there but a vacation cabin in a fairly remote area was a problem. Finally bought a 1000 gallon septic tank and buried it under the garage floor. All the important stuff goes in there when we leave. A really ratty rubber mat is rolled out over the top. The cabin is still vunerable but we don't loose the important things any more.
Wayne

Wayne -- waynele at co.island.wa.us - Monday, 12/21/98 17:41:40 GMT


Re Shop Security. I live on the same property as my shop so no problem there but a vacation cabin in a fairly remote area was a problem. Finally bought a 1000 gallon septic tank and buried it under the garage floor. All the important stuff goes in there when we leave. A really ratty rubber mat is rolled out over the top. The cabin is still vunerable but we don't loose the important things any more.
Wayne

Wayne -- waynele at co.island.wa.us - Monday, 12/21/98 17:42:17 GMT


Andrew: Glad to see you made it to "anvilfire".

For those needing a nice hammer or equipment don't pass up this opportunity. I have seen the item's Andrew has to offer and it is all in great shape and well worth the cost.

Bruce R. Wallace -- Walmetalwk at aol.com - Monday, 12/21/98 18:10:20 GMT


Bruce,

Oh great, just what I needed to hear! Flew apart into three pieces, huh?

You must have some hellacious legs from going up and down hills! :)

Wayne,

Not a bad idea at ALL! And I'm getting ready to build a new house and shop! (Wife is mad, shop has 519 more square feet than the house! grin) Biggest shop I've ever had.

grandpa,

No new ones, but have over worked a couple of the old one! SOB! has been real popular! :) I cut off a foot of "Play Stock" First thing I did was draw it to a point. Which promptly split! :) Let it get too cold, trying to get in one more hit. Looks like someone had had problems like that elsewhere on the bar, too! Wonder if it would be possible to forge weld splits back together?

Andrew, Will try to call later on today.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Monday, 12/21/98 19:14:45 GMT


Well, Jim, now you know why the blacksmiths of old all started to make damascus ( of one kind or another).It is the same in every iron-using culture anywhere in the world. With iron and steel of the kind you describe its the only way to be sure that the darned thing stays in one piece. If it wont weld, weld and weld again!

Olle Andersson -- utgaardaolle at ebox.tninet.se - Monday, 12/21/98 20:29:57 GMT


Olle,

Well, that is going to make life interesting, becuase my planned next "learning step" is to fold my play piece over and forge weld it. My intention is to do it in the forge with an electric blower, rather than the one with the bellows. That increases the challenge, because I have NEVER succeeded in making a forge weld with the electric blower, but I have succeeded with the bellows. Wierd! :)

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Monday, 12/21/98 22:18:23 GMT


Its not the bellows, its the deep forge pot. . . wonder who designed that one. . . :)

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Tuesday, 12/22/98 00:01:14 GMT


Jock,

That may be part of it, but I think the bellows is part of the answer, too. The bellows brings the metal to temp more slowly, so the interior of the metal is almost as hot as the exterior.

The electric blower OTOH, brings the metal to "sparkle" heat on the surface, while the interior is still relatively cool.

Far as who designed it, probably someone with too much time on his hands! :)

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Tuesday, 12/22/98 00:57:35 GMT



Life is very messy right now, but will get details of sword failure/possible solutions out soon. Pictures of the Viking forges should be out in a couple of weeks, and a couple of illustrated articles on making helms and swords over the next month.

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- asylum at us.HSAnet.net - Tuesday, 12/22/98 04:21:13 GMT


what kind of steel would be the best for making swords. i have been making them from old leaf springs made of 5160 steel and wondered if perhaps 1095 would perhaps be a better choice ?
78 deg and sunny in north florida...

allen -- iamlochinvar at webtv.net - Tuesday, 12/22/98 16:53:38 GMT


Gaddy, That Revonoc anvil you mentioned sounds like somebody reversed a common name - Conover - for some reason. The 'C' in a diamond supports that idea. I'll look it up in my anvil book when I get home tonight.

Andy -- anjmorrison at earthlink.net - Tuesday, 12/22/98 20:36:55 GMT


Gaddy, That Revonoc anvil you mentioned sounds like somebody reversed a common name - Conover - for some reason. The 'C' in a diamond supports that idea. I'll look it up in my anvil book when I get home tonight.

Andy -- anjmorrison at earthlink.net - Tuesday, 12/22/98 20:37:29 GMT


Dear Sirs,
My name is Jim Murphy. I am looking for information on making stone mauls and stone chisels, for splitting and shaping field stone. I am
interrested in any advice concerning types of steel, temperment,or
packing. I currently do not own a computer;so if it not too much
trouble, please send any info. to 615 walnut st. Mt. Morris MI,48458
My phone # is 810-687-9665.Thank you.

James murphy - Tuesday, 12/22/98 22:37:44 GMT


LOCHINVAR seeker of the perfect steel, welcome to anvilfire! The very best blades are made of the composite steels commonly called Damascus. Technically they are laminated steel. As early as the Middle Ages swords were made with hard Damascus edges of 300 laminations or more, decorative laminate sides over a soft iron core. The hard edge and laminated sides gave the sword great strength as well as beauty while the soft core made it very difficult to break.

The Japanese swords smiths do something similar from a metalurgical standpoint but in a totaly different manner. They mix wrought iron and hard steel and "kneed" the mixture by folding and welding over and over again.

If you are not excited by all the forge welding a number of makers including "grandpa" Daryl Meier sell blade blanks and Damascus bar. Otherwise one of the high alloy vanadium cutlery steels would be the best modern substitute.

Jock Dempsey -- guru at anvilfire.com - Wednesday, 12/23/98 00:54:15 GMT


Steels for Swords

Allen:

What do you intend to use the sword for? Reenactment swords need to be tougher, so we tend to go with the 60 point steels. The edges get dinged a bit, but nothing that a file can't handle. 1095 would give you a sharp, hard edge, but it would have to be tempered down to at least a blue to avoid brittleness. 1095 is more of a knife/cutting edge steel. As Jock suggests, wou would probably need a more sophisticated structure to support it.

However, it's an art, not a science. If you're using it to cut the roast boar, between wall hangings, and not smacking it into shields and other weapons all day, or you intend to hang it on your bedpost as a last line of defense against burglers, go with 1095. Given the right forging and temper, it might be suitable for some heavy duty swashbuckling. Try it out and let us know.

Temperature started out near 60 at 05:30 this morning, then fell off a cliff before lunch. Windy, cold and freezing up tight on the banks of the lower Potomac. (Time to drag out the de-icer for the pier!)

Bruce Blackistone (Atli) -- asylum at us.HSAnet.net - Wednesday, 12/23/98 04:46:18 GMT


Ah. . . From the man who would wear a sword to work if he could. . .

jdd - Wednesday, 12/23/98 23:12:36 GMT


Don't mean to change the subject, but I could really use some info for the construction of a salt-pot heat treat system. Any ideas?
Clear, cold and windy in So. California.

Joe Caswell -- motojoe at pacbell.net - Thursday, 12/24/98 01:17:13 GMT


Hey Atli: If the break in the tang was at the place where it was welded on, the problem is more concerned with the welding than the grade of steel in the tang. Some Arc welders (folks) don't weld tool steel properly. Cold and slick in the heartland.

grandpa -- darylmeier at usa.net - Thursday, 12/24/98 04:23:10 GMT


Merry Xmas everybody

Grandpa I always forgeweld the tang into the blade with a deep > and a good fit with the tang =====> (dont know a better way to describe it).
Here in Sweden we usually have narrow mild steel tangs through the entire handle which we rivet in the back over a washer (I use brass).
This gives a strong yet light knife (the average blade is about 5x3/4-1 120mmx20-25 and about 2-3/16 2.5-4.5 mm thick. the so called Mora knife)
Hope to be able to teach my girlfriend blacksmithing tomorrow (25 Dec.)
I am forced (more or less) to teach my girlfriend to make scrolls and how to rivet, collar and forgeweld?? them into a gate.
She made it all but impossible to refuse if you teach me I wont be crossed wit you when you stay in the shop all days. And ill be able to help you when you need it. She thinks it is possible to learn in a weekend or two (certainly hope shes a fast learner/take the failure better than she usually does)
Winds around 15 knots (7m/s) and snow with a temperature a few degrees below freezing (-9 C).

OErjan -- Pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Thursday, 12/24/98 14:08:23 GMT


I GOT IT! I GOT IT! It was under the tree! :) :) :)

Number 923 of 1000, signed by Richard Postman himself. Not just signed, but inscribed,

"Merry Christmas Paw Paw
from your best helper."

Enjoy!

Richard A. Postman

BIG grin in Carolina!

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Thursday, 12/24/98 23:06:16 GMT


I have a Meyers Bro's. Triphammer, drill press, wire brush and grinder w/ stand. All complet with reduction pullys, lineshaft and large AC motor. Also 15 to 20 long tonges, Champion 3' dia forge and blower, hand cranked. All equip in running condition shop kept just needs replacement belting. What are these pices worth indivdualy and as complet package? weeback at fbtc.net

Randy Gauny -- weeback at fbtc.net - Friday, 12/25/98 16:44:43 GMT


I HAVE TWO QUESTIONS. I NEED TO FIND SOMEONE WILLING TO TEACH SMITHING IN GENERAL,THAT IS CLOSER TO ME THAN ILLINOIS?(I LIVE IN MADISON INDIANA)AND I ALSO NEED TO FIND A NEW ANVIL THAT ISN'T GOING TO COST AN ARM AND FOUR LEGS.

matt -- dejones at seidata.com - Friday, 12/25/98 20:20:41 GMT


Matt,

For the first question, see my answer on the guru's page. For the second question, contatct Bruce Wallace. (On the links page) Bruce sells both new and used equipment, and you can trust him.

Jim Wilson -- pawpaw at netunlimited.net - Friday, 12/25/98 21:34:34 GMT


SALT POT (John): Don Fogg has a great page about building and using a salt pot on his page. See the link on our links page.

HEY FOLKS! You don't need to post your questions here AND on the guru page to get an answer. We answer ALL questions about blacksmithing on these pages and within hours most of the time!

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Saturday, 12/26/98 14:46:02 GMT


OErjan, we should ALL have such problems! Matter of fact I HAD the same problem once. :) Women are like ALL newbies or worse depending on their mechanical skills. She will get highly frustrated and take it out on YOU, or she will HATE the fact that it is really hard dirty work and give it up. On the other hand, IF she is one of the rare few of us that are destined to pound hot iron you will not be ablt to stop her and you had better get another anvil and forge! She will not be content to just help.

Be careful of inexperianced helpers with good intentions (male OR female). NEVER let them strike for you or handle the hot iron. YOU WILL GET HURT!

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Saturday, 12/26/98 14:58:59 GMT


I agree completly on not trusting newbies with the dangerous parts of blacksmithing
I have an old burn on my arm, about 2x5"saying just that(I even had a beginner catching wite hot steel with his hands when he dropped it=severe burns).
I think she willturn out at least a decent smith, e at least has the strength,she is as strong as most men(she helped to carry a safe the two men on the other side had a hard time keeping up with her)

OErjan -- Pokerbacken at angelfire.com - Saturday, 12/26/98 18:23:18 GMT


Jock,
Thanks for the tip re. salt pot heat treating on Don Fogg's page. Most helpful.

Joe Caswell -- motojoe at pacbell.net - Saturday, 12/26/98 21:46:39 GMT


Duuuude! This is excellent. I am a full time self employed machinist for 10 years, own two mills, two lathes, two bandsaws, several welding machines, surface grinders, and as my wife says "Waaaay too much carbide". Been working with lots of 4140 and A36. I am ordering the books reccomended by Sir Guru. I want to make some classic usable machinist tools as well as others. Just wanted to let you fellows know if you need anything machined, mabye we can do some horse trading. I am quite comfortable with close tolerance work, and love to work with metal. I have wanted to get involved with smithing for a long time. Heavy excitement on this end. Does anyone sell plans for tools? I am also interested in early American Hardware for homes and barns etc.
I am extremely happy to find this site, thank you for all the good information, and your willingness to share.
God bless,
Joseph Delgado jdelgado at inu.net

Joseph Delgado -- jdelgado at inu.net - Monday, 12/28/98 03:40:17 GMT


You can NEVER have enough metal of any kind! Especialy the GOOD stuff like carbides, A-2, monel. . . . Little pieces of 18" round. . . :o)

ABANA has a number of plans for sale. Some of the books sold by Centaur and Norm Larson include plans. Check Metal Web News on our links page. anvilfire will have more plans coming on-line over time. Some will be 100% on-line and others will be available as true scale prints or booklets.

Glad you found anvilfire! Happy Holidays.

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Monday, 12/28/98 04:04:04 GMT


Oooh great guru ones... Just found out something neat. My machinist handbook is the 17th edition! (I must be gettin' old?) One other question... Are old files useful for anything? I have dozens that I have saved over the years that are dull, but I assume that they are made of a useful material. Any scoop? Also I have about 500+ feet of nice 4140 cold rolled round bar .625" dia. left from a recent job. Any neat ideas ? Is it any good for hammerin' on? I was gonna make axles out of it for some pedal cars I'm building.
Buenos Hammeros,
Istola visa,
etc.
Merry Christmas

Joseph Delgado -- jdelgado at inu.net - Tuesday, 12/29/98 01:06:18 GMT


I'm fairly new at blacksmithing. I've made a number of goodies such as draw knives, scorps, hinges, hasps and the like. The one thing I can't seem to get right--even close--is welding. Anyone out there have suggestions?

craig -- oviclh at aol.com - Tuesday, 12/29/98 01:50:26 GMT


OLD FILES are good for all type of blacksmithing projects. Coarse ones like rasps are often into snakes (other animals could be done) taking advantage of the teeth as scales or fur. Many a knife has been forged from a file alone OR as part of a laminated blade. When laminating it is best to grind off the teeth.

I reuse my old files for other tools. Most files do not get worn out near the tang and can be cut off and used for short files. I do pattern making and build and ocassional musical instrument so a lot of file get converted into other tools. My favorite is to take a coarse half round file, cut it off about 1-1/2" (40mm) from the tang, then bend the file portion to make a "spoon" file. Short handled riflers and scrapers are made the same way. Most files will survive cutting with a torch, grinding and bending and be plenty hard for wood working.

4140 is used for ALL kinds of tool making in blacksmithing. It is not good for thin tools like hot cutters but is suitable for punches and drifts, fullers and veiners. I'm sure there are folks that would trade for some too!

FORGE WELDING (Craig): Forge welding takes a combination of practice, judgment and a good forge. Too shallow a fire or too hard a blast and the work oxidizes too much to weld. Dirty or low BTU coal makes it hard to weld. Some gas forges (especialy home built) don't reach welding temperature or do so with too much oxidation.

The two most common errors in forge welded is burning the steel and hitting too hard. The steel can sparkle a little but just below that point it is still weldable and not burned. The higher the carbon content of the steel the lower the welding point. The surface of the metal is liquid or just not quite melted and striking too hard a first blow can blast out the flux AND the weldable material. The first blow should be just hard enough to close the joint and squeeze out the flux. This often LOOKS like you have hit a hard blow but it must be with restraint. The next few blows do the same as you work from the center of the joint. After the joint is closed with the first rapid blows, then you can forge it to shape. IF you see any dark areas in the joint it is because the weld is not complete. Open this portion, flux again and reweld. Fluxing with borax should be done when the steel is at a red heat. Refluxing is often required. Sometimes it is benificial to wire brush off the scale that has formed before fluxing. Your joint should be formed with curved (convex) faces so that the flux and dross can escape.

Forge welding is one of the most frustrating things to learn in blacksmithing. Once you make a weld, PRACTICE. Make more. There is sort of a Zen like method to welding that requires working by feel more than intelectual purpose. Once you learn to recognize that the moment is right you will wonder what all the fuss was about. However, forge welding never becomes "routine". Even among those that do it every day, each weld is a challange and not every weld turns out perfect. Good Luck!

Jock Dempsey -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Tuesday, 12/29/98 15:25:21 GMT


Looking for a good quality all around anvil in or around the San Antonio area. Just something for "beating metal" in my spare time.

Bob Donohue -- rdroper at intx.net - Tuesday, 12/29/98 18:56:58 GMT


Hey Jock;What kind of musical instruments do you make?

dimag -- dimag at yt.sympatico.ca - Tuesday, 12/29/98 20:16:49 GMT


Guitar and Ancient Greek Kithara.

Jock D. -- webmaster at anvilfir.com - Tuesday, 12/29/98 22:10:55 GMT


I'm not familiar with a Kithara.Is that a Zither type instrument or ancestor of the Basouki[sp?].
I play a little guitar myself.[saving up for a big one:-)

dimag -- dimag at yt.sympatico.ca - Wednesday, 12/30/98 01:08:15 GMT


A Kithara is a sophisticated type of lyre. I'll have to post an image. The Irish Basouki is actualy a modern instrument designed to LOOK like a classical instrument. It is based on a Greek mandolin type folk instrument and the European Lute. It came about when a 60's Irish folk musician took the Greek instrument to a maker of fine stringed instruments and said I want something like this but like. . . and the maker added the Lute head to make it LOOK old. .

Jock D. -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Wednesday, 12/30/98 05:31:10 GMT


Just found this page and its great.I have been a bladesmith/Blacksmith for a few years now.I am mostly self taught.
I love these forums for all the great info you pic up.
enjoy
Robert

Robert Bordeaux -- hotanvil at aol.com - Wednesday, 12/30/98 23:05:54 GMT


Robert, where have you been the past 9 months?! Could have used your input a time or two! Happy New Year!

Jock D. -- webmaster at anvilfire.com - Wednesday, 12/30/98 23:27:40 GMT



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