anvilfire.com flaming anvil trademark logo copyright (c) 1998 Patrick J. Dempsey
     HOME!  |  STORE  |  Getting Started in Blacksmithing  
 
   Guru's Den   
   V.Hammer-In   
   Slack-Tub Pub II   
   Tailgate Sales   
   FAQs   
   Glossary   
   Links   
   NEWS!   
   Plans   
   Armoury   
   iForge How-To    
   Health and Safety   
   Book Reviews    
   eBooks On-line   
   Anvil Gallery   
   Vice Gallery   
  Calendar of Events  
   Story Page   
   AnvilCAM - II   
  Touchmark Reg.  
   Power Hammers   
   What's New   
Comic of the Week
   Daily Comics   
Daily Metalworking Comics!
   Webring Nexus   
   Our Sponsors   
anvilfire.com General Site
Welcome visitor from
United States Flag
United States
Country Counter

Tell them you found it on anvilfire.com!





Anvils, Amboß Amboss, l'enclume, incudine, el yunque, bigornia,
städ, incus, aambeeld, batente, kowadło



Anvils in America, THE book about anvils



anvilfire.com Anvil Gallery

anvilfire donated images - Perun Standard Two Horn Anvil

Perun Tyep A (standard) Anvil three quarter view

Perun Standard Two Horn Anvil

Photos provided by Perun, Poland

This a a very clean two horn anvil with very nice geometric design. This anvil was designed by and the foundry pattern made by Andrzej Słowik a Polish blacksmith.

The base of this anvil starts as a circle and has two radii cut out of it to make a clean geometric shape with classic early style feet. The rest of the design is fairly standard but has the very nicely hand carved Perun logo. The hardy hole is up front as is a European standard and is much more solid than out on the heel as on English and American style anvils.

Art of the Anvil

These anvils are beautifully designed and the patterns made by an artist. For many years I have complained about the poor quality of most new anvil patterns. In casting there is no excuse for broken lines, corner seams in the waist, lack of chamfers. All these details only take minutes to create or repair in a wood or plastic pattern.

On forged anvils these things were done OVER AND OVER in heavy hard to move hot steel. In a wood pattern it is dead easy. It is done with rasps and sandpaper (or motorized sanders). Besides the wood being easy to cut the modern pattern maker has plastic fillers that can be used to blend transitions together, make repairs or fix mistakes.

My biggest complaint is not only are many patterns poorly made but there is no ART in them. Where steel is hard to directly produce sculpture in, wood is comparatively very easy. Castings with artistic details cost no more to make than those without. We have far too many anvil patterns designed or made by people who do not understand anvil design from either an engineering OR artistic sense. This is especially true in reproduction patterns where the maker loses the feel of the original design or misplaces features they do not understand.

Congratulations to Perun and Andrzej Słowik for producing such fine works of art.

For more about anvil art and design see Anvil Making

Perun Type A anvil
This anvil is also made in a single horn (square heel) anvil shown above with a short step and the usual English hardy and pritchel hole.

PERUN TWO HORN TYPE A ANVILS
Weight
Length
Height
Face
Hardy
Ø1
Ø2
30 kg (66 lb)
475
190
85
22
22
16
50 kg (110 lb)
600
230
115
22
22
16
75 kg (165 lb)
690
265
120
25
25
16
100 kg (220 lb)
725
285
130
25
25
16
Dimensions in millimeters.

For more details see anvilsperun.com/two_horn_anvils.html

Perun Limited Anvil
Perun Limited Production Anvil
A current production anvil from Perun, designed by Rolf Saladin of Switzerland.


Perun Foundry Pattern
Perun Anvil Foundry Pattern
Split pattern with loose piece core. A current production pattern



Anvil collection images
Anvil Collections Gallery Index
Return to the Anvil Gallery index.

Page Counter Anvils Counter General Site Counter Copyright © 2012 Jock Dempsey, anvilfire.com