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anvilfire.com Anvil Gallery

Anvils, Amboß, incudine, el yunque, bigornia, städ, incus, aambeeld, batente, Hay-Budden, Mousehole

Anvils, Amboß, l'enclume, incudine, el yunque, bigornia,
städ, incus, aambeeld, batente

Old Millstone Forge Museum - Millstone New Jersey Anvils of the world, American, British, Chinese, French, German, ancient and modern. Images from the Ferdinand, Prillwitz and Greenwood collections and the anvilfire image collection.

This collection is the result of many years work by many people. It is the work of the collectors such as Ken and Lenny Lyda-Ferdinand and dealers such as Steve Prillwitz of Matchless Antiques who have graciously taken the time and donated photographs. More may follow. It is also the work of those who have donated and/or given permission to use their photographs. Lastly it is the work of the anvilfire guru, Jock Dempsey, who took many of the photos and has digitally reworked all the images many of which are now digital paintings as much as photographs.

The purpose of this collection is to be a free on-line museum of historical and modern anvils for the curious and for the student. In particular it is for those that think all anvils look alike and those that design new anvils who should know what has come before and what has worked. There are many historical designs that can be improved upon very little and many modern copies that are poorly produced.

New anvils are few in this collection simply because we do not have the photos. It is a sad fact that our industry generally does a very poor job of presenting their product or does so in such small images that it is difficult to tell anything about the product.

This is a continuing project. We have launched it with over 40 anvils but expect to have over 100 when the project is finished. If you have photos you would like to donate we would be happy to consider them.

ANVIL TIP OF THE DAY : Rust and Condensation
Wednesday Oct 18, 2017 - 21/27
Anvils and any heavy metal objects such as machine tools and heavy steel benches attract condensation due to being cool when the temperature changes. Equipment that is cool at night does not warm up as quickly as the air in the morning. The result can be condensation covering every exposed surface. Due to the surface tension in the forming droplets of condensation they cover surfaces much greater than if you poured water on the machine of left it out in the rain. There are two solutions to condensation. Stable indoor temperatures prevent most condensation. Otherwise in unheated or open-air shops paint, oil and cosmolene (or petroleum jelly) must be kept maintained to prevent rust due to condensation.

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