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Hand Forging by Thomas F. Googerty

Blacksmithing, EQUIPMENT, drawing, sledge, forging, black heat, hammer, scale, dirt, scrape, old file, anvil, crown, rounded, Peter Wright
"The anvil, when new, is a little rounded on top across the face, and it is made high in the center to resist the strain from the blows of the hammer and sledge. As the anvil becomes old this high place gradually becomes lower, and finally there is a slight hollow where it receives the most blows. "
NOTE: Crowning anvils was only common for a brief period with Peter Wright producing anvils with a quite high crown. I have only seen this once. Most anvils are produced with a flat face.
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THE EQUIPMENT 39 drawing, in places where the sledge is liable to injure the work. When finishing a forging of any kind, work it down smooth with a black heat and light blows of the hammer. Knock Fig. 11. The Wrong Way to Draw a Piece of Iron II D Fig. 12. The Right Way off all the scales and dirt. If it cannot be hammered off, scrape it off with an old file. This makes the work look better. The anvil, when new, is a little rounded on top across the face, and it is made high in the center to resist the strain from the blows of the hammer and sledge. As the anvil becomes old this high. NOTE: This was only common for a brief while with Peter Wright producing anvils with a quite high crown.

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