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Anvils, Amboß Amboss, l'enclume, incudine, el yunque, bigornia,
städ, incus, aambeeld, batente наковальня



Anvils in America, THE book about anvils



anvilfire.com Anvil Gallery

anvilfire donated images

PS Stubs No. 16 Jewelers Anvil

PS Stubs Jewelers Anvil
This beautiful little anvil weighs a pound (1/2 kg) or less but the design would suit a 500 (~230 kg) or larger shop anvil.
Stubs Jewelers Anvil with dimensions

PS Stubs No. 16 Jewelers Anvil

Photos provided by Macdara ÓhUallacháin Graham digitally processed by Jock Dempsey

These small anvils were hand forged from the primitive steel of the era, hand filed to a fine finish and heated treated. The decorative filing (whitesmith work) is beautifully executed on this tool. The Stubs company, famous for their files, was a dealer who had many tools made in small cottage workshops. Stubs often provided the steel to part time makers who produced tools in the winter and farmed in the summer.

Detail jewelers anvil punch hole

LEFT: The small 1 mm (1/32 to 1/16") punching hole tapers open at the bottom so slugs will fall out and tools do not get stuck. This is still the standard on modern jewelers anvils.


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Macdara ÓhUallacháin Graham is an artist jeweler and blacksmith from Armagh, Ireland.

In chapter 12 of James Nasmyth's autobiograhpy he discusses his visit to Stubbs about 1834 and Stubbs use of cottage industry. The area of Warrington where Stubb's was located had many craftsmen decended from the Normans. Stubbs noted that many of the peculiar names for tools and implements were traceable to old Norman-French words. Antique jewelers tool.



18th Century Jewelers Anvil
Small hardened and tempered jewelers anvil from the Josh Greenwood Collection. Similar to the above.


   Bush/Zenith Jeweler's Anvil
Smaller than many souvenir anvils these jeweler's anvils often appear in collections. Sovie Estate Collection.


   French Jeweler's Anvil
Old two piece anvil and stand. This style is commonly made today. Sovie Estate Collection.

Two Jewelers anvils Jewelers' Anvils
Currently available jewelers' anvils. Links to others.

Anvil collection images
Anvil Collections Gallery Index
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