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Anvils in America, THE book about anvils

The Greenwood Anvil Collection - Title Image with 15 blacksmiths anvils

The Bombed GHH Anvil

The Dresden Anvil

The GHH Anvil damaged in WWII bombing

From the Josh Greenwood Collection.

This anvil is pre WWII from the MAN Good Hope Mill Gute Hoffnungshütte (GHH)1 factory in Oberhausen Germany, the first heavy industry (founded as St. Antony in 1758) in the Ruhr region. They built large steel bridges, weapons and diesel engines during WWII. MAN facilities throughout Germany were heavily bombed by the Allies and the damage to this anvil was a result.

Damage from military bombing is different than typical damage to an anvil. Notice the deep explosive impact divots in the front foot. Both horns which showed little or no signs of use were snapped off.
  • Marking : weight only
  • Dimensions:
    • Length 40-1/8" (1019 mm)
    • Height 14-1/2" (368 mm)
    • Face 6-1/4" wide ( 159 mm)
    • Base 12-1/2 x 16-1/8" (318 x 427 mm)
    • Hardy (square) hole : 1-1/8" (29 mm)
    • Pritchel (round) hole 15/16 (24 mm)
  • Weight: 225 kg. (496 lbs.)
After much debate about the historical value of this anvil it was decided to repair it so that it would be usable again. Parts were forged from appropriate steel, the weld area cleaned up, then preheated and the repair parts weled on from the center out (full penetration). Then they were carefully ground to shape and blended with the surrounding material.


1. Wikipedia - MAN SE

The Guam Vulcan

The Guam Vulcan
Another WWII historical relic from Anderson Air Force Base, Guam.

The Greenwood Anvil Collection


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Rare and ancient European and Early American anvils.

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